Blog Post #1: Fitness In Today’s Age

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Fitness In Today’s Age:

Fitness According to the Internet
The internet describes fitness as “the condition of being physically fit and healthy”. Social media tends to go beyond the literal definition to tell us what fitness “looks” like. So often we see images of stick thin fitness models with rippling abs and thigh gaps. We see the cleanses, the detoxes, and the diets sprawling across out newsfeed, being endorsed by celebrities. These images range from inspirational to unattainable and often we find ourselves more discouraged than inspired.

Online Trickery

We are well aware of the photoshop, lighting and angle trickery that riddles these photos, but yet we are mesmerized anyway. Captivated by these people who seem to have it all figured out, who look like they are carved out of marble with porcelain skin and perfect bodies. We like, we share, we comment. We want the diets, and the supplements that will help us to reach this peak fitness. We follow the workouts and buy the equipment only to realize that we aren’t getting the same results that we see splayed across the screen. Why is it that we cannot look the way that they do? We follow their steps and see some improvements, but we don’t mirror the perfect image that we see as we scroll through Instagram.

Fitness Has No Face

Maybe it is because fitness isn’t a particular body, or diet. Fitness doesn’t have a “look” because fitness is different for every person. It is impossible to know a person’s level of fitness and health by merely a glance. Fitness is often immeasurable unless you are a medical professional. Fitness does not have a face. Fitness does not have a body.

As a former division one college athlete I have been on the court with opponents of nearly every body type and I can attest that they were all at peak fitness. I have been across the net from girls that were extremely tall, extremely short, thin, thick, muscular, lean, overweight, underweight and they all were fit and they all were badass athletes.

Fitness is A Feeling

Fitness is feeling good in your own skin. It is moving your body in ways that are exciting to you and that make you feel good and empowered. It is about progress, but not towards an appearance goal, but towards getting stronger and faster. It is about setting new goals and achieving them, only to set bigger and better goals. It is a competition, but not with the unrealistic images we see on our screen, with ourselves.

Fitness is Not a Journey, But a Lifestyle

We often hear the word “journey” thrown around in the discussion of fitness. I dislike the word journey because it foreshadows an end. Fitness doesn’t have an end; there is no finish line or stopping point. You don’t receive a trophy or a gold star and then call it quits. You don’t stop when you fit into the clothing size that you were striving for, or hit the perfect number on the scale. Fitness is a lifestyle. It has a beginning, it has ups and downs, and trials and tribulations. It has breaks and restarts, but it does not have an end. It is a continuous process. One that is meant for health and a positive connection with your body and what it can do.

Setting Realistic Goals

Goals shouldn’t be appearance based. This can lead you down a very dangerous path of self loathing, destruction and disappointment. Goals should be geared towards your strengths. If you are at the beginning of your fitness path, do not set goals for someone that has been on theirs much longer than you. Be realistic. Know your body, know your ability and know your competition, YOU. Start small and gradually increase as you start to hit your goals. Get creative with new ways to push yourself and have fun with it. Find workouts that don’t feel like you are working out. This is key to sticking with your personal fitness. It has to be fun!

Check out my next blog for some fun, fab and fit ways to get active without dreading the process!

Stay Tuned!

XOXO Tennis Girl

*The Club at Harper's Point does not guarantee results, which can vary from individual to individual.